Adrian Goes Gonzo

Red Sox player Kyle Snyder holding the World S...

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I, like most native and transplanted Bostonians, am cloaked in black, mourning the epic and disgraceful collapse of the Boston Red Sox.

Several hundred million dollars for a couple of marquee players, and the World Series title was surely stamped and ready to mail to Beantown.  Oh, but are we ever accustomed to the Sox letting us down – Bucky Dent’s homer, Bill Buckner’s wickets, the Rocket’s mouth, the ’75 Reds, Aaron Boone.  What’s not as customary, however, is witnessing the whining and blaming the collapse on other forces.  Coaches coach; players play – win by the sword and die by it.

Except for Adrian Gonzalez – he of the near MVP-caliber season, plucked from his hometown Padres for astronomical riches and athletic greatness.  He blamed God and ESPN.

Huh?

And what does this have to do with crisis communication?  In pure sports terms, it’s called manning up; in crisis communication (and the Sox, all players included, are in crisis mode even if the season is over) it’s called, well, manning up.  Acknowledge fault, errors, mistakes, etc., and what you and the team need to do in the future to minimize the likelihood of this happening again.  And then go out and do it.

A Herculean payroll assembled what was purported to be a sure-fire bet to bring another title to Fenway.  Gonzo and his banker can attest to that.  The first baseman, by all standards, had a spectacular season.  He has the stats to back it up, but apparently not the fortitude to accept the team failed and address it accordingly.  It was someone else’s fault – a higher power and the worldwide leader in sports – not the team or its players.

Go Tigers!

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